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Uopx Bio 101 Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

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Week 3 Antibiotic-resistant essay

Are antibiotic-resistant bacteria on the rise? Well in the study we just finished there are some very compelling evidence that points to yes. However depending on how you look at the last study the information may be that the rise of resistance is in direct correlation with the amount of the antibiotics that are being used. For example we will start with some of the evidence given in the investigation. First is the problem with the finding of new classes of antibiotics. From the 1930s to the 1970s discovery of classes were fairly similar increasing every decade up to the 1970s. After the 1970a the discovery of new classes of antibiotics fell drastically. A known worry is that if new classes can not be created then eventually antibiotics will be depleted. Also the investigation states that once a strain builds resistance to a type of antibiotic of a class that all types of the class are resisted. The next study of a Erythromycin from 1976-1988 that dosage of that particular antibiotic tripled in just twelve years. The study shows that over the course of those years bacteria became more resistant over the study. Next we looked into the prevalence of resistant bacteria in relation to prescriptions. Over a four year study from 1995-1998 the percentage of resistant bacteria rose 5%. This shows us that the more antibiotics prescribed will result in a increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This is unsettling considering the amount of antibiotics used today. Scientist began looking for a way to possibly reduce the amount of resistant bacteria and I will talk about the two studies in the investigation. The first study consisted of two groups that are routinely given antibiotics. The first group is a controlled group and is given only one type of antibiotics while the other group is a given a rotation of 3 different types. The…...

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