Telling Tales

In: Social Issues

Submitted By keithjohnston0
Words 14898
Pages 60
Telling Tales: how to sell an electric car in a petrol market
The story of the G-Wiz

Keith Johnston, October 2011

Table of Contents

Gentlemen, start your motors P2 October 2011 P4 How it all started P5 A new approach to car retailing P9 Right people, right places P13 A remarkable community P16 Spreading the word P17 The power of storytelling P25 Accolades P28 Introducing the concept of Verbal Identity P31 Taking the high – and highly visible – ground P34 Polarising opinion P36 The bully in the playground P38 What the media said P42 G-Wiz customers have their say P50 The future P54 Appendix: A brief history of electric vehicles P57 The truth about electric vehicles: - The emissions debate P60 -Why we need electric vehicles P62 The people behind the brand P67 Final thoughts P70

“Keith has given us a unique insight into the creation of an iconic brand which became a household name in record time. What is particularly pleasing is that unlike some others, this was no accident or even timing bubble, it was very well thought through, planned and executed. Not many can claim to have earned a whole chapter in the future text books of their chosen profession. Keith Johnston, his backers and the whole G-Wiz team have done just that and a great deal more.” Iain Sanderson, founder and chairman, Lightning Electric car Company.

“GoinGreen redefined the concept of investing in a car. These guys have put their heart and soul into these cars. In everything they write and every interaction they have, their passion oozes out. It's a tough challenge to move several billion mindsets and get us thinking seriously about our combined impact on the world. Faced with a car market that is dominated by massive dinosaurs, who would have thought a few guys banding together with no marketing budget, a revolutionary approach to sales and a product that ignores everyone who says…...

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