Structure and Function of the Respiratory System

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The Structure and function of the Respiratory system
The respiratory system is to enable the body achieve successful gas exchange, the system is specialize in properties allowing this process to function adequately. Firstly the Trachea which is your wind pipe has the structure of a long tube with strong C-rings of cartilage running down it, the reason of this is so that when you are laying down or moving organs such as your lungs don’t put pressure on your trachea as this would block the air flowing through this structure allows the function of the trachea to remain open at all times allowing us to breathe. The trachea along with the bronchi are all lined with ciliated cells, these cells have hair like structure which all rhythmically move in a sweeping motion. This is then supported by Goblet cells which produce Mucus so that dirt, bacteria and dust can stick to it, this then is supported by the ciliated cells which sweeps the mucus up the trachea to the epiglottis to be swallowed into the stomach and the pathogens then killed in the stomach or to be coughed out. This structure allows the function of disposing of bacteria and foreign pathogens as well as dirt so that it can be removed from our body. It’s important in the respiratory system that the structure allows efficient gas exchange. This is done by things such as the alveoli as this only has walls which are one cell thick which allows rapid diffusion rates. The alveoli also has a large service area because it increases the amount of gas exchange they can do. The alveoli also has a very rich blood supply this aids the respiratory function of gas exchange as with all the capillaries running through them and rich blood more oxygen is able to be carried in the red blood cells. The very beginning of the respiratory system even has the specialised function of nose hair to collect unwanted dust and smoke particles…...

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