Separation from Britain

In: Historical Events

Submitted By esmith2011
Words 1397
Pages 6
For the separation from Britain there were plenty of reasons that they needed to have a divorce per se. There were all of the various tax laws that were being implemented without their consent. There was a time when innocent colonists were slaughtered so that brought around a major dislike for their parent country. Among the colonists there were three main opposing views: Radicals, Moderates, and Loyalists. Within the ranks there were many key players such as, George Washington, and Patrick Henry. Radicals, the brutes of the colonies, these are the people that really want to withdraw from the parent country of Britain. They were the ones who were behind the tea party in the Boston Harbor where multiple boxes of tea were upheaved over the edge of a boat to demonstrate their dislike of the current tea tax. These were also the people behind multiple tar and feathering where hot tar was poured onto people who were against their point of view to separate. Bullying, threats, various acts of destruction were all a part of their agenda to get colonists to understand that staying aligned with Britain was a terrible idea. Although they were correct in their point of view they chose the complete wrong way to go about it because force is rarely an option.
Moderates, the “on the fence” group of the new colonies, this group of colonists weren’t sure of which way to go with their alliance. They went along with Radicals in some of their views, but on the flipside they also understood the points of the Loyalists. With this group their forty percent of the population was enough to tilt either side. Going along with the Radicals and their forty percent as well would give them a majority of eighty percent over the minor twenty percent of the Loyalists. But even with their small number if the Loyalists were joined by the Moderates they would have overcame the almost majority of the…...

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Ginnifer Goodwin | Graduate School Applications | stream 1964