Patriarchy

In: English and Literature

Submitted By roya
Words 7674
Pages 31
Bargaining with Patriarchy Deniz Kandiyoti Gender and Society, Vol. 2, No. 3, Special Issue to Honor Jessie Bernard. (Sep., 1988), pp. 274-290.
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http://www.jstor.org Fri Jun 15 11:56:33 2007

BARGAINING W I T H PATRIARCHY
DENIZ K A N D I Y O T I Richmond College, United Kingdom

T h i s article argues that systematic comparative analyses of women's strategies and coping mechanisms lead to a more culturally and temporally grounded understanding of patriarchal systems than the unqualified, abstract notion of patriarchy encountered in contemporary feminist theory. Women strategize within a set of concreteconstraints, which I identify as patriarchal bargains. Different forms of patriarchy present women with distinct "rules of the game" and call for different strategies to maximize…...

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