Oer in the 3rd Sector

In: Computers and Technology

Submitted By egan6677
Words 941
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OER in the third sector

Mimas’ expertise in the creation, management and storage of Open Educational Resources (OER) through services such as Jorum, the UK’s national repository for OER, has led to a strong and mutually beneficial partnership with one particular charity, through an essential online learning project.

In the beginning

OER is a term that has become familiar amongst the academic community and concerns such as, “Why should I share my resources?” or “My materials are not good enough to share” are, thankfully, fading. There is still some way to go, but programmes such as the HEFCE-funded UKOER programme which has encouraged 1000’s of academics to share resources, and the deliverance of events such as open education week and OER13 have instilled confidence in the fact that sharing is good.

But what about those who need to transfer knowledge outside of the educational arena? Those for instance who work in the third sector?

OER for all

Most of us have benefitted from, or received support from some type of charity. Their work often continues under the radar as they offer help and support to millions of people and animals in need, but, with public-sector cuts on the rise, it is crucial they find ways of reaching target audiences through online tools to ensure the continuation of crucial funding. Cue the creation of OERs.

Paws for applause An unlikely partnership?

An unlikely partnership between Mimas and Cats Protection began almost a year ago, prompted by the success of our work with Jorum, and the belief that, through sharing knowledge, we can help those beyond our own immediate community to understand the great value of OER.

Laura Skilton, Jorum Business Development Manager and Lisa Barry, Learning and Development Manager at Cats Protection, began working together to find out how our expertise in OER could help the charity to…...

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