Lipids

In: Science

Submitted By devin28
Words 1200
Pages 5
Lipids
Devin Hurley
Kaplan University

Lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates help maintain the function of the body. Without proteins, the body would be weak. Proteins help promote the activities one does on a daily basis. These activities could be skating, bending, and several others. Antibodies are formed from protein. Antibodies fight potential diseases and viruses. Enzymes are a form of proteins that helps break down and digest food. Proteins transport oxygen through the body. Proteins form hair and nails. Animals’ hooves, horns, scales, feathers, and other animal parts are formed from protein (National Institutes of Health, 2011).
Lipids are made up of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The three elements are essential for the body to function properly. Essential fatty acids cannot be made by the human body. These come from foods or vitamins. The Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids work together to maintain the overall health of the body. These fatty acids work against heart disease and strokes. Good cholesterol is promoted by these fatty acids. Bad cholesterol decreases due to Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids. The chance of bone loss is lowered by the increase of calcium that the body uses in response to the fatty acids. Lipids are not able to cross the plasma membrane. Lipids must be transported by protein carriers (Tortora & Derrickson, 2014, p.48)
Carbohydrates fuel the body. The body converts food into sugar. The sugar produces the energy the body needs to function. The sugars contribute to the cells, organs, and tissue. There are three different types of carbohydrates. There are starches, sugar, and fiber. Starches contain grains. Grains contain bran, germ, and endosperm. Bran contains fiber and minerals. Germ has several nutrients and essential fatty acids. The endosperm contains the starch. There two types of sugars. There are added sugars and natural…...

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...Lipids
and
Their
Structures
 Definition:
Organic
molecule
of
biological
origin
that
is
insoluble
in
water
 and
soluble
in
nonpolar
solvents.
 Solubility
Explained:
Lipids
do
have
both
nonpolar
and
polar
regions;
 however,
the
majority
of
the
molecule
is
nonpolar
(due
to
large
nonpolar
 tails).
Since
"like
dissolves
like",
lipids
are
soluble
in
nonpolar
solvents.
 There
are
eight
general
categories
of
lipids,
but
I
will
only
go
into
seven
 (fatty
acids,
waxes,
triacylglycerides,
phospholipids,
prostaglandins,
steroids,
 and
lipophilic
vitamins)
 Fatty
Acids
(Function:
Precursor
to
other
lipids.)
 Structure:
Carboxylic
acid
and
long,
unbranched
hydrocarbon
chain
 
 • Most
have
an
even
number
of
carbons

 • Most
common:
12‐20
carbons
 • May
or
may
not
have
pi
bonds
in
the
chain
(saturated‐
no
C=C
and
unsaturated‐
 1+
C=C)

 • Saturated
fatty
acids
are
not
too
fancy,
don't
over
complicate
them.
Check
out
 these
examples
to
see
the
extremely
small
differences
between
them.
 
 • Within
unsaturated
fatty
acids
are
divided
into
monounsaturated
fatty
acids
(one
 C=C
bond)
and
polyunsaturated
fatty
acids
(more
than
one
C=C
bond)

 •......

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Words: 536 - Pages: 3

Lipids

...of health problems, ranging from dry skin to heart disease. REFERENCES Davidson, M. (2004). Plasma Membrane. Retrieved from http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/cells/plasmamembrane/plasmamembrane.html Hudon-Miller, S. (2012). How do Fatty Acids Make Energy? Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8Yh6Zf51qc&feature=youtu.be Lyman, E. (2012) Model building lipids. Retrieved from http://youtu.be/4km6BOaj9pg Mandal, A. (2010, March 22). Vitamin A Functions. Retrieved from http://www.news-medical.net/health/Vitamin-A-Functions.aspx Neitzel, J. (2010). Fatty Acid Molecules: A Role in Cell Signaling. Retrieved from http://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/fatty-acid-molecules-a-role-in-cell-14231940 O'malley, M. (2014) Fatty acid oxidation leads to ATP production. Retrieved from http://wgu.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=0a7a8229-fcac-43a8-913e-16871f29545a Sanders, J. (2013) Fatty acid structure. Retrieved from http://wgu.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer/Default.aspx?id=defcf97e-dd60-4de2-9055-d72a7e3334a3 Sanders, J. (2014, October 10). Recorded Webinar on Lipids. Retrieved from http://wgu.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=e5d56401-a5a4-4a57-9db0-5da97a7ee574 Wilson, L. (2013, November 12). A Balancing Act - The Importance of the Fat Soluble Vitamins: A, D, E & K. Retrieved from http://www.naturalgrocers.com/nutrition/balancing-act-importance-fat-soluble-vitamins-d-e-k Yacoub, J. (2014, June 28). How Are......

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