Hypothyroidism

In: Science

Submitted By airiel2004
Words 2002
Pages 9
Juana Davidson
Hypothyroidism
Professor Cocimano
HTH 1105- 92016

To understand hypothyroidism, you must first understand the function of the thyroid. The thyroid gland is a small, butterfly shaped organ at the base of your neck, measuring only 2-4 inches in diameter. (Sagmiller, 2) The principle role of the thyroid gland is to manufacture, store, and secrete the thyroid hormones, 1-thyroxine (T4) and triidothyroxine (T3). The thyroid is also responsible for storing much of the body’s supply of iodine, which is used to form T4 and T3. The hypothalamus detects a need for more thyroid hormone and signals the pituitary gland to make thyrotropin (TSH). The thyroid then adjusts its production of hormones based on the amount of TSH it receives. When the thyroid does not make enough hormones, hypothyroidism occurs. (Blanchard and Abrams-Brill) Simply put, hypothyroidism is the result of an underactive thyroid. Because the thyroid controls metabolism, regulates body temperature, affects body weight, muscle strength, energy level, and fertility (Sagmill, 206), an underactive thyroid can have significant effects on individuals who are diagnosed with hypothyroidism. There are an estimated 27 million people living with hypothyroidism, the majority being female. Women are nine times more likely to develop this disease, most cases occurring during the childbearing years. (Blanchard and Abrams-Brill, 1491) While not as common; men and children are still susceptible to the disease. After the age of 65, the number of men and women with hypothyroidism evens out. (Blanchard and Abrams-Brill, 2669) Due to the role iodine plays in conjunction with hypothyroidism, individuals living in iodine deficient areas are 10 to 20 times more likely to develop hypothyroidism. Pregnancy can also bring out gestational hypothyroidism in expecting mothers, roughly 1 in 50. (Everydayhealth.com)…...

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