Green Chemistry

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Submitted By jytb
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Green chemistry, also called sustainable chemistry, is a philosophy of chemical research and engineering that encourages the design of products and processes that minimize the use and generation of hazardous substances. Whereas environmental chemistry is the chemistry of the natural environment and of pollutant chemicals in nature, green chemistry seeks to reduce the negative impact of chemistry on environment by preventing pollution at its source and using fewer natural resources.
As a chemical philosophy, green chemistry applies to organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, biochemistry, analytical chemistry, physical chemistry and even chemical engineering. While green chemistry seems to focus on industrial applications, it does apply to any chemistry choice. Click chemistry is cited as a style of chemical synthesis that is consistent with the goals of green chemistry. The focus is on minimizing the hazard and maximizing the efficiency of any chemical choice.
In 2005 three key developments in green chemistry were identified: use of superficial carbon dioxide as green solvent, aqueous hydrogen peroxide for clean oxidations and the use of hydrogen in asymmetric synthesis. Examples of applied green chemistry are supercritical water oxidation, on water reactions and dry media reactions.
Bioengineering is also seen as a promising technique for achieving green chemistry goals. A number of important process chemicals can be synthesized in engineered organisms, such as shikimate, a Tamiflu precursor which is fermented by Roche in bacteria.
The term green chemistry was coined by Paul Anastas in 1991. However, it has been suggested that the concept was originated by Trevor Kletz in his 1978 paper in Chemistry and Industry where he proposed that chemists should seek alternative processes to those involving more dangerous substances and conditions.
Paul Anastas, then of…...

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