Diseases of Affluence

In: Social Issues

Submitted By Mululu
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• Diseases of affluence Less strenuous physical exercise, often through increased use of a car Easy accessibility in society to large amounts of low-cost food (relative to the much-lower caloric food availability in a subsistence economy) More food generally, with much less physical exertion expended to obtain a moderate amount of food More high fat and high sugar foods in the diet are common in the affluent developed economies of the late-twentieth century More foods which are processed, cooked, and commercially provided (rather than seasonal, fresh foods prepared locally at time of eating) Increased leisure time Prolonged periods of inactivity Greater use of alcohol and tobacco Longer life-spans . Explain how these cause disease.

• 8. Diseases of affluence Cardiovascular disease Read the article and summarise the main findings. This can take the form of a Mind Map

• 9. Diseases of affluence Nutrition and exercise There are a number of reasons why affluence brings ill-health. One of the most important is lack of exercise. People in tertiary sector jobs are desk-bound and commute long distances by car or public transport, rather than walk. Longer hours and longer distances to commute also mean less time to cook healthy food. Fast food or convenience food, the consumption of much more food than can be used , and less movement all set people up for obesity, high blood pressure, and general poor fitness. Obesity in particular is thought to increase the risk of heart disease, diabetes and some kinds of cancer

• 10. Diseases of affluence Medical advances There are other factors in making people susceptible to diseases of affluence. Less exposure to pathogens and agents of infection from infancy on, and greater reliance on medication and antibiotics leave people with lower natural immunity than is usual, while longer lifespans inevitably increase the…...

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