Despite the Extent of Globalisation, Some Critics Comment on the Fact That Its Insidious Effects on Developed and Developing Countries Are the Equal of Its Beneficial Influence with Regard to Individuals and Societies.

In: Social Issues

Submitted By mingxiang
Words 985
Pages 4
Globalisation can be defined as the process of the world becoming smaller in terms of connectivity, communication and breaking down trade and border barriers. It has brought about positive as well as negative effects to the world. This essay will examine how the outcomes of globalisation play a part in developed and developing countries and their impacts on Singapore. Technology can be described as a crucial factor for most globalisation processes. Technological advancements have brought about convenience and the world closer. A study by Martin Prosperity Institute (2011) ranked the top ten countries in terms of their investment in research and development and the majority are developed countries. There is heavy emphasis on research in the development of technology because of the enormous potential of economic growth by the possible improved efficiency and productivity in manufacturing processes. Nevertheless in developing countries, they look to immediate technology in order to combat poverty. Using science and technology, developing countries can accelerate the growth of fields such as medicine, electronics and farming techniques and these advances reduce poverty and human suffering (United Nations, 2005). However, technology does not necessarily benefit both developed and developing countries. Globalisation could result in the digital divide and this happens in all countries regardless if they are developed or developing. Those who have the financial ability will be wired and connected to the world compared to those who do not have the financial means to do so. This would beget a gap of knowledge and skills that can be gained from networking with the world and it would widen as income gap among people increases. Hence, it is evident how technology has generated both benefits and detriments to developed and developing countries. Another important outcome from…...

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